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  2. "I care. It fucking terrifies me how much I care."
     
  3. ameowchow:

    god i miss skins

     
  4. thekylagray:

    This life has its challenges.

    Never forget who you were in the beginning because that will be what saves you in the end.

    G’nite 💋
    xoxo kg

     

  5. Tumblr

    Can’t believe I decided to take a stroll down tumblr memory lane. Holy shit

     
  6. mareblogs:

    nightandmorn:

    mermaidandthemoon:

    nataliemeansnice:

    mareblogs:

    nataliemeansnice:

    this body is my home. it’s where i live, eat, sleep, love, cry, hug, work, and everything else. you wouldn’t allow someone to repeatedly come to YOUR home and treat you badly, would you? then try not to do it to yourself. you live here. if someone else tries to come in to your home and make a mess, tell them they aren’t invited back. ever again.

    I’m conflicted about how I feel about this. As a feminist, I love her sense of self-confidence. I love that she feels beautiful and is unafraid of voicing that to the world. Not every woman is feels that way, but every woman should.

    At the same time, and I’m not going to beat around the bush, she’s obese. She’s obese, and she’s sending out the wrong message. Being obese is unhealthy, and not doing anything about it is even worse.

    I want every woman to feel beautiful.. beautiful enough to motivate them into action. Your body is your home, your temple. Treat it to a healthy lifestyle, and inspire others to do the same.

    Maybe then I’ll rally behind your message.

    you call yourself a feminist yet incite body hate and shame towards another woman?

    you need to reevaluate what you label yourself as. you’re neither a doctor nor a very good feminist. you’re making us look bad.

    mareblogs
    go fuck yourself. not your body, not your business

    mareblogs, I love you. We have been friends for a very long time, and you’ve been there for me countless times. 

    But I have to vehemently disagree with your post.

    First of all, your blanket statement that obese persons are unhealthy, or in other words fat = not fit, is incorrect.

    1. Fat vs. Fit

    How can someone be both fat and fit? Let’s define what “fit” is. Fitness is the capacity to do aerobic work. Take sumo wrestlers for example. Sumo wrestlers have BMIs that exceeds the range that is obese, into morbidly obese territory, yet they are metabolically healthy. They have normal blood glucose, blood lipid, blood pressure profiles, etc. 

    You cannot assume that because a person is obese, that they are unhealthy. You don’t know their history. 

    2. Your blanket statement that being obese is unhealthy and not doing anything about it is fat discrimination. Overweight and obese persons are assigned the stereotypes that they are lazy, unmotivated, rude, glutinous etc. “Oh, they’re fat because they’re LAZY” “Look at them. How could they get this way? Because they’re undisciplined”. 

    Even if someone is obese and not doing anything about it, how dare you police a person’s body?  How dare you say that all women should love themselves, unless they are fat? I find that very offensive. 

    I will leave you with this article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/29/fat-shaming-weight-gain_n_3670560.html

    Finally, science is echoing what body image bloggers and other advocates have said for years: shame doesn’t inspire anyone to change.”

    Oh wow. I was not expecting this amount of vilification for my post. And nightandmorn, I’m glad that we’re good enough friends with each other that we can call each other out when we disagree. Now, about this post. It seems like I have quite a bit to apologize for, sooooo… here goes. All the feminists are rejecting me from the in-group because, as Jennie puts it, they perceive this as an “attack on womanhood.” Another “social constriction.” In retrospect, I see why people are upset. I was body policing and inadvertently body shaming. For that, I deeply apologize. It was not my intent. I also apologize for assuming; I don’t know her history/habits. You’re right when you said someone could be metabolically fit, yet not appear so, and that may very be the case for her.

    I understand that someone could have hormonal imbalances which makes it difficult/impossible to lose weight. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a prime example. As someone who is taking medication for this, I’ve had extensive conversations with my endocrinologist about it, and the ramifications of what could happen if I am not continually active.

    "How dare you say that all woman should love themselves, unless they are fat." Whoa whoa whoa. How in the world did my message get so misconstrued? I was not saying that at all! I do think she’s beautiful, and I don’t want any woman to think of themselves otherwise. Self-confidence is sexy! Having a healthy body image is beautiful!

    But, and this is a huge but, there is difference between having a healthy body image and a healthy body. I’m stuck between a rock and a hard place.. the whole “love your body” message is a fantastic message to send, but it also promotes acceptance obesity. This is a controversial public health issue, and I’m sorry but I cannot promote a culture that normalizes this.

    Your example about sumo wrestlers is valid; you can be fit and overweight. Being “fit” and “healthy” comes in very diverse spectrum of BMI. Someone who is thin but does not exercise is not necessarily more “fit” than someone who exercises on a daily basis but has more external fat.

    On AVERAGE though, those who are exposed to this message do not know that. And many of those who are obese are not like sumo wrestlers; they are not exercising on a daily basis. The increasing prevalence of obesity in our society concerns me; every year 400,000 people die of obesity related issues. The US spends BILLIONS of dollars on health care attributable to obesity and health related issues, many of which are preventable. And thus, obesity has become society’s problem.

    I can’t tell you what the proper prescription to this would be. Any intervention or social marketing is going to have its flaws, because we’d have to reduce stigmatization and be cognizant of other ethical concerns. Was my approach wrong? Yes. I didn’t realize how offensive that post could be to some readers, and many feminists are harping on me because of it. However, I’m an advocate for public health too. I think it’s important that we have these conversations to draw attention to the issue, however controversial or insensitive it may seem.

    You know me much better than most people @nightandmorn. I am definitely someone who advocates for self-love and acceptance, like this wonderful woman in the picture. But I’d be lying if I told you I supported this message wholeheartedly.. I simply can’t.

     
  7. (via senshuk)

     
  8. (Source: wealthandluxury, via xgraci33)

     
  9. (Source: brandinator, via theredgummy)

     
  10. vivianchen:

    “Another glorious Sierra day in which one seems to be dissolved and absorbed and sent pulsing onward we know not where. Life seems neither long nor short, and we take no more heed to save time or make haste than do the trees and stars. This is true freedom, a good practical sort of immortality.” - John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra

    This past weekend my husband and I decided to go on a last minute vacation and headed up to South Lake Tahoe and visit Desolation Wilderness. It was my second time going, the first being a backpacking trip we did back in September of 2011. We hiked to Lake of the Woods and Lake Aloha from Echo Lakes and explored the breath-taking alpine landscape. Nothing made me feel more blessed and grateful to be alive than sitting at the edge of these lakes, taking it all in.

    You can see more from our trip on my Instagram or VSCO Grid.

    And I’ll be there in a few weeks… can’t wait.

    (via nachonancy)